Archive for the ‘college students’ Category

Bath Salts, A Growing Drug Problem

January 28, 2011

bath salts latest trend in drug use new recreational drug teens college-aged students white powdery substance sold legally hallucinogenic drug known Methylenedioxypyrovalerone MDPV MDPK Mtv Magic Peeve Super Coke cocaine  plant food insect repellents Cloud 9 Ivory Wave Hurricane Charlie Red Dove Ocean Charge Plus White Lightning White Dove Scarface inhaled smoked swallowed injected snorted hallucinations suicide poison control centers school campuses parent prevent mood-altering Cleared2Drive driving while under the influence drug

Most bath salts contain some form of sodium, glycerin and a fragrance.  The latest trend in drug use is not your typical bath salt.  There is a new recreational drug being used by teens and college-aged students across the nation and all social circles.  The white powdery substance is being sold legally by labeling it as bath salts.

While it is not actually a bath salt but instead, is intended to be used as a hallucinogenic drug known as Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), MDPK, Mtv, Magic, Peeve or Super Coke (as it is similar to cocaine).  This substance is purposely falsely labeled bath salts, plant food or insect repellents under the names Cloud 9, Ivory Wave, Hurricane Charlie, Red Dove, Ocean, Charge Plus, White Lightning, White Dove and Scarface so it can be sold legally.

When inhaled, smoked, swallowed, injected or snorted; the drug acts much like cocaine giving its users hallucinations, raising blood pressure, increasing in heart rates and even bringing on thoughts of suicide, sometimes with the attempt or successful attempt to follow.  Health experts at many poison control centers are reporting that they have already seem more cases thus far in 2011 than they saw in all of 2010.

Drug use on school campuses is perhaps one of the reasons some families choose to keep their children home to educate them and avoid the unnecessary pressure from peers.  Unfortunately, these trendy drugs can find their way into even the most well-meaning parent’s home.  Fortunately, as a concerned and active parent, you have the opportunity to prevent your children from choosing these mood-altering substances.  But, they make the ultimate decision as to whether or not they will heed your advice.

When you are concerned that your child “might” just once try it, you need to take every precaution you can including installing a Cleared2Drive system on your child’s vehicle so at least you are assured that they won’t be driving while under the influence of this or any other drug.

Cleared2Drive takes their hats off to the students athletes at the U of Virginia in their fight against on campus substance abuse

January 24, 2011

Susan Bruce director of UVA's Gordy Center for Alcohol and Substance Education college substance abuse binge drinking alcoholism student athletes Apple Conference University of Virginia Cleared2DriveStudent athletes at the University of Virginia are fighting drug and alcohol abuse on grounds and in the locker room.

More than 250 college players and coaches from across the country stepped off the field this weekend to figure out how to prevent substance abuse in their teams and universities.

Leaders of the Apple Conference say the number one substance problem in college is alcohol.

They say while stats show those who put on a uniform are less likely to pick up a bottle, those athletes who do, tend to binge drink more than average.

Susan Bruce, the director of UVA’s Gordy Center for Alcohol and Substance Education explained, “If you want to have change on your campus and in your department, you have to have student athletes involved and you have to have enough people to really make a difference.”

Cleared2Drive provides  peace of mind to students, parents and faculty as it prevents anyone from driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.   Let’s keep us all safe from DUI accidents/injuries/fatalities.

Marijuana use up in teens – Alcohol use down

December 21, 2010

alcohol students binge drinking underage drinking laws Mothers Against Drunk Drive MADD survey positive influence substance abuse Cleared2Drive system prevent impaired driving under the influence DUI DWI arrest college scholarshipsAccording to the 2010 “Monitoring the Future” survey released by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) the numbers are rising on marijuana use among young teens. Sixteen percent of surveyed eighth grade students in the U.S. reported using marijuana in 2010, compared to just over 14 percent last year. It appears that high school students are smoking more marijuana than cigarettes.

What accounts for the increase? Principal investigator Dr. Lloyd D. Johnston, research professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research believes many teens no longer see marijuana as dangerous. “The most visible influence in today’s culture that would explain such a change in perceived risk among teens is the extended national discussion about the desirability of medical marijuana use combined with the more recent discussion of legalizing it in California,” Johnston says.

And, marijuana use isn’t the only thing that’s up.  Increasingly more teens are also using Ecstasy. “I think it has been so long since the main Ecstasy epidemic, which peaked in 1991, that a lot of today’s teens never heard about some of the adverse consequences that were widely reported back then,” Johnston explains. He says NIDA has been warning for years that use of the drug could go back up, as young people become less aware of the dangers.

There is some good news in the survey, however. Alcohol use among teens is down substantially. Johnston points out that in 1999, 31% of 12th-grade students reported binge drinking. In 2010, that number decreased to 23%. Johnston thinks the decline is due in part to retailers doing a better job of cooperating with underage drinking laws.  He also believes that the Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) ad campaigns, and the increase in minimum driving age has helped curb teen access to and interest in alcohol.

Some 56,000 8th, 10th, and 12th graders participated in this latest NIDA survey.

The declining numbers in alcohol abuse attest to the fact that parents and society can have a positive influence on curbing substance abuse among teens. Johnston urges parents to be proactive in communicating to kids the dangers of drug use. “Be sure that you indicate that you would be disappointed if they used drugs,” Johnston advises. “That’s a major deterrent to kids becoming involved with drugs.”  For parents that are concerned that their child might be susceptible to using either drugs or alcohol and then attempt to drive, they can install a Cleared2Drive system in their vehicle as Cleared2Drive does more than just prevent impaired driving, it also works as monitor for parents.  If their child can start their car one day but not the next – maybe after a night out with friends – then it could because they are under the influence.  Cleared2Drive’s Impairment Detection Technology also protects against a child getting a DUI or DWI arrest or into a car accident which can ruin their chances for college scholarships.

Drug Prescriptions Double for Teens and Young Adults Compared to 15 Years Ago

December 13, 2010

Cleared2Drive Good2Go drunk driving impaired driving  Breathalyzers Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) ignition interlock device Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Drunk DrivingTwice as many teens and young adults are getting prescriptions for controlled substances than had been 15 years ago, Reuters reported Nov. 29.

Investigators led by Robert J. Fortuna, MD, of the University of Rochester’s Strong Children’s Research Center in New York, assessed U.S. prescription trends for 15- to 29-year-olds based on 2007 survey data from more than 8,000 physicians, clinics, and emergency departments. They then compared results with similar data from 1994. Analysis revealed that more than 11 percent of teenagers received prescriptions for controlled medications (including Oxycontin, Vicodin, Ritalin, and sedatives) in 2007, up from 6 percent in 1994. A similar trend was seen for young adults, where the prescription rate for such drugs rose from 8 to 16 percent over the same time period.

As noted by Fortuna, the rise does not necessarily mean the drugs are being diverted or abused. However, teenagers and college students are much more likely than adults to use prescription drugs recreationally and to pass them on to others. “Physicians need to have open discussions with patients about the risks and benefits of using controlled medications, including the potential for misuse and diversion,” he said. “The nonmedical use of prescription drugs by adolescents and young adults has surpassed all illicit drugs except marijuana,” concluded the authors. “This trend and its relationship to misuse of medications warrants further study.” The article was published online Nov. 29 in the journal Pediatrics.

Studies like this reinforces what we at Cleared2Drive have been saying, we need to stop focusing on ways to eradicate “drunk driving” and focus on what is truly happening in our society which means we need to focus our efforts on eradicating “impaired driving.”  Breathalyzers and all the effort that the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety(IIHS) is putting into developing their Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) technology will do nothing to stop someone under the influence of illicit drugs or prescription drugs (better known as  drugged driving) from operating a vehicle but Cleared2Drive’s ignition interlock device (IID) that is based upon their internationally patented Impairment Detection Technology will. Even Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) now admits that we need to stop focusing solely on “Drunk Driving” and put our efforts behind stopping “Impaired Driving”.