Archive for the ‘counseling’ Category

Treatment vs Jail: Portugal’s Success

January 5, 2011

drugs problem addicted arresting addiction illegal jail treatment counseling Portugal flag government addicts abuse drug-related court crime problem public health drug-using criminals ignition interlock device Cleared2Drive relapsing

The United States has been fighting the war on drugs for decades now and there seems to be no end in sight which bring to mind the old proverb about the definition of insanity – “Doing the same thing the same way and expecting a different result.’  Well I think it is time we start doing things differently and here is a good example of where we should start.

Big Risk, Big Reward

Ten years ago, Portugal had a big drug problem. 100,000 people, or about 1% of the population, were addicted to drugs. Portugal found itself in the never-ending cycle of arresting drug criminals, prosecuting them, and then after their sentence was complete finding them back on the streets again. It’s one of the main problems countries face when trying to end drug addiction and the crimes that so often are associated with it.

In 2000, Portugal passed a law that decriminalized the use of all illegal drugs. Drugs are still illegal in Portugal, but instead of throwing someone in possession of drugs to jail, it sends them to treatment or counseling. Portugal wrote it into law that anyone caught with illegal drugs instead of being charged with a criminal offense will go directly to a “Dissuasion Committee” for counseling and further treatment if necessary.

It’s not a new concept, but it is one that is difficult to carry out. How does a government take the first step and say that citizens aren’t going to get in trouble if they are caught with illegal drugs? Fears in Portugal were that everyone would go out and try drugs, and that the country would become full of addicts who were getting away with their drug abuse. But that hasn’t happened. In the last 10 years, Portugal has seen drug-related court cases drop 66%, the number of drug abusers has remained the same, and the number of people receiving treatment rose 20%. Most importantly, some of the country’s worst neighborhoods, once plagued with drug addicts and crime, have become safe.

Opponents

Some argue that policies like these are too soft on drug addicts, and without pressure and the threat of jail some people will never change, and for some people that is true. But only in countries that become lax when it comes to carrying out the law do they see an increase in drug users, but in countries like Portugal who have followed through with the treatment part of the plan, they have seen success. It works because they have changed the drug problem from a law enforcement issue to a public health issue which can be more openly managed.

Throwing a drug addict in jail does little good. We can expect 48% of substance abusing criminals to get caught using drugs again. However, if we can get these people the help they need to live a life without drugs, we can change their lives for good and we would encourage these countries to implement a mandatory ignition interlock device like Cleared2Drive program, which can prevent drugged or impaired driving as they too have proven very successful in keeping people from relapsing.

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The Treatment Research Institute Opens New Center

December 20, 2010

policy makers Joint Meeting Alcohol Treatment Effectiveness JMATE Baltimore recovery treatment brief intervention Community Reinforcement and Family Training CRAFT Partnership at DrugFree.org  Impairment Detection Technology Cleared2Drive sobriety sober The Treatment Research Institute (TRI) in Philadelphia will officially launch a new research center for parents of substance-using adolescents at a national conference this week. TRI said the center would be the “first-of-its-kind” and would focus on translating evidence-based research into specific strategies and tools that will help parents better help their teen-aged children who are struggling with substance abuse problems.

Kimberly C. Kirby, Ph.D., the director of the new center said, “Our goal is to get practical help to parents without short-changing the need to base advice on a solid scientific foundation.”  Funded for five years by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the center’s work was presented to parents, substance abuse professionals, and policy makers at the Joint Meeting on Alcohol Treatment Effectiveness (JMATE) in Baltimore Dec. 14-16.

The new center will focus its work on three projects aimed at helping parents with adolescents all along the spectrum, from occasional users to those in recovery after treatment.

  • First, the center will study the efficacy of a brief intervention for non-dependent teens. Rather than being guided by a counselor, the intervention would be led by parents.
  • Second, researchers at the center will create a consumer guide to adolescent treatment to help parents identify evidence-based care for their children. The research will be conducted in Philadelphia and result in an evaluation protocol that can be disseminated in other cities.
  • Third, researchers plan to refine and test the Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) protocol for use by parents of treatment-resistant teens. Among their goals are to verify the protocol’s efficacy with teens and to create a manual for parents.

The Partnership at Drugfree.org will partner with TRI to disseminate the findings of the new center to parents.

We commend this good work and certainly hope that they expand their reach by offering to introduce Impairment Detection Technologies like Cleared2Drive’s as a means to ensure continued sobriety and success because we all know that get sober is not the most difficult aspect of sobriety, it the maintenance of a individual’s sobriety that is the hardest part.

Michigan Middle School Students Overdose at School

December 16, 2010

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Two students from Derby Middle School in affluent Birmingham Michigan are OK after experiencing a bad reaction to some prescription drugs they took during the school day. The drugs were not prescribed to the students and “it wasn’t an accident,” according to Corporal Ron Halcrow, school liaison officer for Birmingham Public Schools and the Birmingham Police Department.

Halcrow said the Dec. 1 incident wasn’t considered an overdose, but a “medical reaction.” – oh really!  Is that now the politically correct term for overdosing on drugs that aren’t even yours? I would venture to say that he wouldn’t be claiming a “medical reaction” had the children died! He said the incident occurred during the lunch hour at Derby, when the two students were found by teachers to be very drowsy. After school officials investigated, they learned the children had taken an undisclosed amount of prescription medication one of them had brought from home.

Halcrow couldn’t say what the medication was or how much was taken, but both students were taken to the hospital as a precaution. The students were turned over to their parents and no police reports were filed, Halcrow said. Because prescription drugs were involved, though, Halcrow said he’ll be hosting counseling sessions with the students and their parents about the dangers of prescription medication.

Derby Principal Debbie Hubbell sent a letter to school parents Friday, warning about the dangers of giving students access to prescription medication. “By using these medications for purposes other than they are intended to help, students are putting their health at risk. We do know this has become an issue in many communities and we want parents to be aware of the implications,” the letter said.

Hubbell asked parents to consider what’s in their medicine cabinets and whether their children have access to it. “This would be a perfect time to talk with your child about the dangers of medications and possible side effects,” Hubbell said in the letter.

This would also be a good time for parents to start thinking about what could have happened if they had  just been a couple years older.  Had these students been just a couple of years older and went undetected, without a Cleared2Drive system installed in their vehicles that detects impairment from drugs or alcohol, they could have driven impaired and harmed themselves or others.  You can’t wait till an accident happens to protect your child.  It is always better to be safe than sorry.